Single-Cell Information Analysis Reveals That Skeletal Muscles Incorporate Cell-to-Cell Variability as Information Not Noise

Takumi Wada, Ken ichi Hironaka, Mitsutaka Wataya, Masashi Fujii, Miki Eto, Shinsuke Uda, Daisuke Hoshino, Katsuyuki Kunida, Haruki Inoue, Hiroyuki Kubota, Tsuguto Takizawa, Yasuaki Karasawa, Hirofumi Nakatomi, Nobuhito Saito, Hiroki Hamaguchi, Yasuro Furuichi, Yasuko Manabe, Nobuharu L. Fujii, Shinya Kuroda

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

    12 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    Cell-to-cell variability in signal transduction in biological systems is often considered noise. However, intercellular variation (i.e., cell-to-cell variability) has the potential to enable individual cells to encode different information. Here, we show that intercellular variation increases information transmission of skeletal muscle. We analyze the responses of multiple cultured myotubes or isolated skeletal muscle fibers as a multiple-cell channel composed of single-cell channels. We find that the multiple-cell channel, which incorporates intercellular variation as information, not noise, transmitted more information in the presence of intercellular variation than in the absence according to the “response diversity effect,” increasing in the gradualness of dose response by summing the cell-to-cell variable dose responses. We quantify the information transmission of human facial muscle contraction during intraoperative neurophysiological monitoring and find that information transmission of muscle contraction is comparable to that of a multiple-cell channel. Thus, our data indicate that intercellular variation can increase the information capacity of tissues.

    Original languageEnglish
    Article number108051
    JournalCell Reports
    Volume32
    Issue number9
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - Sept 1 2020

    All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

    • General Biochemistry,Genetics and Molecular Biology

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