Novel aldo–keto reductase AKR2E9 regulates aldehyde content in the midgut and antennae of the silkworm (Bombyx mori)

Kohji Yamamoto, Satoshi Endo

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1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

We studied the effects of green leaf volatiles (including reactive aldehydes) emitted by plants on insects that feed on these plants. The silkworm (Bombyx mori) is a model lepidopteran that eats mulberry leaves. Defense-related enzymes in silkworms can be targeted for developing new pest control methods. The aldo–keto reductase (AKR) superfamily catalyzes aldehyde reduction by converting a carbonyl group into an alcohol group. Here, we characterized a novel silkworm AKR, designated as AKR2E9. Recombinant AKR2E9 was overexpressed in Escherichia coli. The recombinant protein was used, along with nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate as a coenzyme, to reduce aldehydes present in mulberry (Morus alba) leaves. The catalytic efficiency of AKR2E9 toward various aldehyde substrates and its inhibitor sensitivity was lower than those of AKR2E8. High expression levels of akr2e9 messenger RNA (mRNA) were detected in the midgut and antennae of silkworms. In the antennae of adult silkworms, akr2e9 mRNA was more abundant than akr2e8 mRNA. The catalytic efficiency of AKR2E9 was low because of steric hindrance, due to which its active site is blocked. High expression levels of AKR2E9 in the midgut and antennae suggest that it may regulate the detoxification of toxic aldehydes in silkworms.

Original languageEnglish
Article numbere21979
JournalArchives of insect biochemistry and physiology
Volume112
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jan 2023

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Physiology
  • Biochemistry
  • Insect Science

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