Mechanical characterization and modelling of the temperature-dependent impact behaviour of a biocompatible poly(L-lactide)/poly(ε-caprolactone) polymer blend

Gustaf Gustafsson, Masahiro Nishida, Yoshitaka Ito, Hans Åke Häggblad, Pär Jonsén, Tetsuo Takayama, Mitsugu Todo

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

    6 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    Poly(ε-caprolactone) (PCL) is a ductile, bioabsorbable polymer that has been employed as a blend partner for poly(L-lactic acid) (PLLA). An improvement of the material strength and impact resistance of PLLA/PCL polymer blends compared to pure PLLA has been shown previously. To use numerical simulations in the design process of new components composed of the PLLA/PCL blend, a constitutive model for the material has to be established. In this work, a constitutive model for a PLLA/PCL polymer blend is established from the results of compressive tests at high and low strain rates at three different temperatures, including the body temperature. Finite element simulations of the split Hopkinson pressure bar test using the established constitutive model are carried out under the same condition as the experiments. During the experiments, the changes in the diameter and thickness of the specimens are captured by a high-speed video camera. The accuracy of the numerical model is tested by comparing the simulation results, such as the stress, strain, thickness and diameter histories of the specimens, with those measured in the experiments. The numerical model is also validated against an impact test of non-homogenous strains and strain rates. The results of this study provide a validated numerical model for a PLLA/PCL polymer blend at strain rates of up to 1800s-1 in the temperature range between 22°C and 50°C.

    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)279-290
    Number of pages12
    JournalJournal of the Mechanical Behavior of Biomedical Materials
    Volume51
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - Nov 1 2015

    All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

    • Biomaterials
    • Biomedical Engineering
    • Mechanics of Materials

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