Inverse Association Between Resting-State Putamen Activity and Iowa Gambling Task Performance in Patients With Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder and Control Subjects

Suguru Hasuzawa, Hirofumi Tomiyama, Keitaro Murayama, Aikana Ohno, Mingi Kang, Taro Mizobe, Kenta Kato, Akira Matsuo, Kazufumi Kikuchi, Osamu Togao, Tomohiro Nakao

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Symptoms of obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) have been conceptualized as manifestations of decision-making deficits. Patients with OCD exhibit impairment during the decision-making process, as assessed by the Iowa Gambling Task (IGT). This impairment is independent of clinical severity and disease progression. However, the association between the decision-making deficit and resting-state brain activity of patients with OCD has not been examined. Methods: Fifty unmedicated patients with OCD and 55 matched control subjects completed IGT. Resting-state brain activity was examined using the fractional amplitude of low-frequency fluctuations (fALFFs). fALFF analysis focused on the slow-4 and 5 bands. Group comparisons were performed to determine the association between IGT performance and fALFFs. Results: There was a significant group difference in the association between the IGT total net score and slow-4 fALFFs in the left putamen (voxel height threshold of p < 0.001; cluster size threshold of p < 0.05; family wise error-corrected). Higher putamen slow-4 fALFFs were correlated with lower IGT scores for OCD patients (r = −0.485; p < 0.0005) and higher IGT scores for control subjects (r = 0.402; p < 0.005). There was no group difference in the association between the IGT total net score and slow-5 fALFFs. Conclusions: These findings in unmedicated patients demonstrate the importance of resting-state putamen activity for decision-making deficit associated with OCD, as measured by IGT. The inverse correlation may be explained by the hypersensitive response of the putamen in patients with OCD.

Original languageEnglish
Article number836965
JournalFrontiers in Psychiatry
Volume13
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - May 13 2022

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Psychiatry and Mental health

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