Extinction Threat to a Previously Undescribed Species of Gall Wasp (Hymenoptera: Cynipidae) and Two Associated Parasitoid Species (Hymenoptera: Braconidae and Eulophidae) on a Threatened Rose

Yoshihisa Abe, Tatsuya Ide, Kazunori Matsuo, Kaoru Maeto, Yajiao Wu

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Diplolepis ogawai Abe and Ide sp. nov. (Hymenoptera: Cynipidae) induces galls on Rosa hirtula (Regel) Nakai (Rosales: Rosaceae), which is endemic to a restricted area of Honshu, the main island of Japan. The gall is induced mainly on the leaf of R. hirtula in spring and the mature gall falls to the ground in early summer. The gall-inducing wasp emerges from the gall on the ground in the following spring, suggesting that D. ogawai is univoltine. From spring to summer, the braconid Syntomernus flavus Samartsev and Ku and the eulophid Aprostocetus sp. are parasitic on the larva of D. ogawai in the gall, and the adult wasp of both parasitoid species emerges from the gall on the ground in summer. For S. flavus, this is the first distribution record in Japan and the first host record. Since R. hirtula is threatened with extinction by succession and deforestation, D. ogawai and its two parasitoid wasp species are considered to be at risk of coextinction with the threatened rose. In the event that the population size of this rose species is further reduced, D. ogawai and its parasitoids may -become extinct prior to the extinction of R. hirtula. To conserve these three wasp species associated with R. hirtula, protection of remnant vegetation where individuals of this threatened rose species grow is necessary.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)154-161
Number of pages8
JournalAnnals of the Entomological Society of America
Volume116
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - May 1 2023

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Insect Science

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Extinction Threat to a Previously Undescribed Species of Gall Wasp (Hymenoptera: Cynipidae) and Two Associated Parasitoid Species (Hymenoptera: Braconidae and Eulophidae) on a Threatened Rose'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this