An NPR technique for pointillistic and mosaic images with impressionist color arrangement

Linlin Jing, Kohei Inoue, Kiichi Urahama

    Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

    8 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    A simple non-photorealistic rendering (NPR) technique is presented for creating pointillistic and mosaic images with color arrangement resembling the impressionist paintings. An input image is partitioned into rectangular tiles which are grouped into blocks. The color of tiles is changed to ones maximally far apart from each other while their local average approximates the color of the input image. The resultant mosaic image with the tile size of only one pixel is used for creating pointillistic images like to ones by George Seurat. Their blending with the original image produces a mosaic image resembling that by Chuck Close. Some modifications are also incorporated into the color transformation to improve the reproducibility of mosaic images blended with a collection of tiny images.

    Original languageEnglish
    Title of host publicationAdvances in Visual Computing - First International Symposium, ISVC 2005, Proceedings
    Pages1-8
    Number of pages8
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 2005
    EventFirst International Symposium on Advances in Visual Computing, ISVC 2005 - Lake Tahoe, NV, United States
    Duration: Dec 5 2005Dec 7 2005

    Publication series

    NameLecture Notes in Computer Science (including subseries Lecture Notes in Artificial Intelligence and Lecture Notes in Bioinformatics)
    Volume3804 LNCS
    ISSN (Print)0302-9743
    ISSN (Electronic)1611-3349

    Other

    OtherFirst International Symposium on Advances in Visual Computing, ISVC 2005
    Country/TerritoryUnited States
    CityLake Tahoe, NV
    Period12/5/0512/7/05

    All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

    • Theoretical Computer Science
    • General Computer Science

    Fingerprint

    Dive into the research topics of 'An NPR technique for pointillistic and mosaic images with impressionist color arrangement'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

    Cite this