Activatable Near-Infrared Fluorescence Imaging Using PEGylated Bacteriochlorin-Based Chlorin and BODIPY-Dyads as Probes for Detecting Cancer

Fusa Ogata, Tadanobu Nagaya, Yasuhiro Maruoka, Joshua Akhigbe, Adam Meares, Melissa Y. Lucero, Andrius Satraitis, Daiki Fujimura, Ryuhei Okada, Fuyuki Inagaki, Peter L. Choyke, Marcin Ptaszek, Hisataka Kobayashi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

30 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Near infrared (NIR) fluorescent probes are attractive tools for biomedical in vivo imaging due to the relatively deeper tissue penetration and lower background autofluorescence. Activatable probes are turned on only after binding to their target, further improving target to background ratios. However, the number of available activatable NIR probes is limited. In this study, we introduce two types of activatable NIR fluorophores derived from bacteriochlorin: chlorin-bacteriochlorin energy-transfer dyads and boron-dipyrromethene (BODIPY)-bacteriochlorin energy-transfer dyads. These fluorophores are characterized by multiple narrow excitation bands with relatively strong emission in the NIR. Targeted bacteriochlorin-based antibody or peptide probes have been previously limited by aggregation after conjugation. Polyethylene glycol (PEG) chains were added to improve the hydrophilicity without altering pharmacokinetics of the targeting moieties. These PEGylated bacteriochlorin-based activatable fluorophores have potential as targeted activatable, multicolor NIR fluorescent probes for in vivo applications.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)169-183
Number of pages15
JournalBioconjugate Chemistry
Volume30
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jan 16 2019
Externally publishedYes

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Biotechnology
  • Bioengineering
  • Biomedical Engineering
  • Pharmacology
  • Pharmaceutical Science
  • Organic Chemistry

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Activatable Near-Infrared Fluorescence Imaging Using PEGylated Bacteriochlorin-Based Chlorin and BODIPY-Dyads as Probes for Detecting Cancer'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this